Name
Phone
Email
City
State
More Information
Preferred Contact Method?Phone Email

Meth Drug Help

Meth is a drug that individuals across the united states are falling prey to. Many of these users are unaware of the dangers of this drug and how deadly the consiquences of using meth are. This page will provide you with information on how to help yourself or someone you care about who has a problem with meth. Meth kills by causing heart failure, brain damage and stroke. The problem of meth can be remedied with knowledgeable help.

Anyone can develop a problem with meth. There is no known single characteristic shared by everyone who abuses meth. An individual who has a problem with meth can be any age, profession, ethnic group or social class.

Meth is a powerfully addictive stimulant that dramatically affects the central nervous system. Meth in the last 10 years has become one of the most widely abused street drugs in our nation. It's use and abuse has devastating effects on the user's mind and body. The drug is made easily in clandestine laboratories with relatively inexpensive over-the-counter ingredients. These factors combine to make meth a drug with high potential for widespread abuse and addiction.

Meth has toxic effects. In animals, a single high dose of the drug has been shown to damage nerve terminals in the dopamine-containing regions of the brain. The large release of dopamine produced by methamphetamine is thought to contribute to the drug's toxic effects on nerve terminals in the brain. High doses can elevate body temperature to dangerous, sometimes lethal, levels, as well as cause convulsions.

If you or someone you care about has a problem with meth and needs help here are some important tips to keep in mind:

  1. Don't Rescue the Addict
    Friends and family members can attempt to protect an addict from the consequences of his behavior by making excuses about his addiction or getting him out of trouble. This behavior must stop! Once the addict experiences the effects of his behavior, he may become more motivated to stop using drugs.
  2. Don't Become an Enabler
    Family members should be careful not to reward the addict by paying his bills, bailing him out of jail, letting him stay for free or ignoring his behavior.
  3. Be Honest
    Tell the addict that you are concerned about his meth addiction and want to be supportive for him while he gets help. Support your concern with examples of the ways in which his meth use has caused problems for you, including any recent incidents.
  4. State the Consequences
    Tell the addict that until he gets help, you will leave him to the consequences of his behavior and will no longer bail him out. Make it clear that you are not trying to punish the addict, but protect yourself from the harmful effects of his addiction.
  5. Be Prepared
    If the addict is ready get help, don't wait. Once he's agrees to get help, work immediately to find the treatment approach that is right for the individual.
  6. Don't Give Up
    If the addict refuses help, don't give up. Be supportive and don't enable or allow his behavior. Listen whenever you can and be ready to help the addict into treatment when he is ready.
  7. Find a treatment approach
    The importance of locating a qualified treatment facility is important to the addicts recovery. There are numerous types of treatment programs available, find one that is right for the individual.

It is important that the individual receives help early on in their abuse. Treatment is known to be more effective if conducted at the onset of the problem. Treatment options include a wide range of approaches: education, counseling, therapy, rehab, and groups. Our website will help you in your search for the treatment approach that is right for you or someone you care about who has a problem with meth.

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming
© Copyright 2004 All Rights Reserved. Content is protected under copyright laws, do not use content without written permission.